6 Best Scanner Apps for iPhone & iPad 2018


The iPad allows for a higher class of apps, not in terms of production quality but in terms of what they can do — and what can they enable us to do. That's because they paint across a bigger canvas. More isn't always better but when you can see more and do more on a larger screen, it really is better. That's part of the reason the iPad App Store has been so successful, with hundreds of.

While we've rejected The Omni Group's to-do app for being a little too complex for the kind of to-dos we creatives want to track, it's precisely that complexity that makes its project planning app a must-have — though only for big projects, and only for senior folk if you're self-employed, mind you, or work in a very small team, guess what? Really, this ten-scene artistic endeavor is a surreal, mesmerizing semi-interactive animated film. LookUp has a more colorful way of thinking, primarily with its entry screen. For free, you can import PDFs along with Microsoft Office files , make highlights, and drag excerpts to a work area. Paprika is ideal for people who live in the kitchen.

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However, if you have an iPhone or iPad, you can turn it into a second display for your Mac or PC with this app, which earns it a spot in our list of the best iPad apps for designers. While earlier apps that did this worked wirelessly (convenient, but laggy and compressed), Duet Display works over the cable, whether Lightning or pin, with full support for Retina and touch.

The iPad app is optimised for iPad Pro with plenty of tweaks to take advantage of its larger screen, and if you absolutely need project updates wherever you are, there are also apps for Apple Watch and even iMessage. Key to most design projects is getting the typography right, and if you want to avoid falling into the trap of relying on a handful of go-to fonts, it's good to have a decent font reference to hand.

Monotype's FontBook is just that kind of reference; it documents the libraries of type foundries, covering 1, designers, 46, typefaces and 9, font families. You can browse fonts by class, foundry, designer, year or name, and the iPad app enables you to bookmark favourites and also share samples on Twitter and Facebook.

Okay, so a part of our lives is sketching and painting — and if you're going to do that, you need a great tool. So next in our list of the best iPad apps for designers is the mighty Procreate. This is a truly wonderful natural media app, and it's very fast — especially on more recent iPads where it can take advantage of their huge power.

What's more, it's optimised for the iPad Pro, with massive, ultra-hi-definition canvases, and will work with the Apple Pencil too. However good an iPad app is, sometimes you just really need to use one of your full-fat desktop packages. And while there are plenty of remote desktop apps such as TeamViewer that you can use to get to your actual desktop from your iPad, they're heavy on bandwidth and there's something not quite right about wrangling a mouse-driven interface on a touchscreen.

Parallels Access does things a bit differently, giving you full access to your desktop and using its special 'Applification' technology to render your desktop apps as native apps, making them much easier to use on the go and also ensuring you can work without a fat internet connection. It'll even work on 3G. If what you want is the digital equivalent of a sketchbook, rather than a canvas — somewhere to write stuff down, doodle out a few ideas, take notes in a meeting — get Noteshelf. Its ability to mix typed, audio and handwritten notes — with beautiful ink effects — annotate documents and images, and even define custom paper designs to make it easy to create, say, iPhone wireframes for sketching app designs makes it an extremely handy iPad app for designers.

It pairs with a range of third-party styluses too, for pressure sensitivity and wrist rejection. Adobe makes loads of apps for iOS, but this one is especially great on the iPad.

With it, you can quickly and easily create mockups and wireframes for designs for web, print and more, and you can export them to Creative Cloud stablemates InDesign, Illustrator or Photoshop to work them up further. It's a great way to make productive use of commute time, say — though of course just staring blankly out of the window can be just as effective!

Apple's Reminders app is actually more useful than most people give it credit for — especially if you set up reminders lists that can be shared among a team — but there's no doubt a more accomplished to-do manager will help you keep on top of complex projects more easily. Some swear by OmniFocus, but for us it's just a little too daunting in its power. Things, though, lets you define some sensible groupings, makes it simple to add and sort new tasks, and lets you easily see what deadlines are imminent.

Look here for details of what you'll find in the new version of Things. While we've rejected The Omni Group's to-do app for being a little too complex for the kind of to-dos we creatives want to track, it's precisely that complexity that makes its project planning app a must-have — though only for big projects, and only for senior folk if you're self-employed, mind you, or work in a very small team, guess what?

With OmniPlan, you can create Gantt charts to allocate time and resources to specific parts of a project, and because each part is interrelated, you can keep focused on what the material effects will be of the wireframing process, say, taking longer than you had anticipated. Everything is live and shared, and it will help you resolve scheduling impossibilities. Hate how much time you spend on email? Make your team try Slack — it starts free, with some limitations — and marvel at all the time you get back.

We've also included links to in-depth reviews where available. Rest assured that even those apps that haven't been fully reviewed are included because they've impressed us after some serious hands-on time. The former aren't included because default apps are easy to find—they already live on your iPad's home screen. The latter aren't included because we've broken out the best iPad games into their own dedicated article. Looking for apps for your other devices? For more than a decade, Jeffrey L.

When he isn't staring at a monitor or two and churning out web This newsletter may contain advertising, deals, or affiliate links. Subscribing to a newsletter indicates your consent to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. You may unsubscribe from the newsletters at any time. PCMag reviews products independently , but we may earn affiliate commissions from buying links on this page. Wilson Senior Analyst, Software. More From Jeffrey L.

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